Prestigious venues in Brussels

When Léon Wielemans, of the Wielemans-Ceuppens brewery in Forest, bought land in Rue Defacz on which he wanted to build a house for his wife, he turned to architect Adrien Blomme to realize his dream.

In the 1920s in Brussels, Art Deco expressed the modernity of a young, entrepreneurial, open-minded bourgeoisie. The architecture was very much associated with decorative arts and innovative ideas such as airplanes, automobiles, ocean liners, wireless, new technologies and new materials.

Adrien Blomme was an enthusiastic, sensitive and erudite creator, always attentive to his clients’ aspirations. No basement kitchen, dark narrow corridor or wooden stepladder for him – he wanted warm and friendly spaces.

Wielemans and Blomme had been friends for a long time; both of them were free-thinking and shared enthusiasm for a new type of aesthetic. Yvonne Wielemans adored Spain, and the couple took their architect to Granada. There he drew the first sketches of the new building, working with great freedom around one absolute mandatory: the creation of a patio. The Wielemans chose Azulejo ceramic tiles, imported them to Brussels and once again, the osmosis took its natural course.

In 1994 the Historic Monument and Sites Department of the Brussels-Capital Region listed Wielemans Hotel as well as its garden: the whole property reflected the expression of a certain modernism of this “crazy” time in Brussels.

The building was occupied for several years by CIVA (International Centre for City, Architecture & Landscape) before being acquired by the Generali Company in 1997, which rehabilitate it in an exhibitions and events venue.

When Léon Wielemans, of the Wielemans-Ceuppens brewery in Forest, bought land in Rue Defacz on which he wanted to build a house for his wife, he turned to architect Adrien Blomme to realize his dream.

In the 1920s in Brussels, Art Deco expressed the modernity of a young, entrepreneurial, open-minded bourgeoisie. The architecture was very much associated with decorative arts and innovative ideas such as airplanes, automobiles, ocean liners, wireless, new technologies and new materials.

Adrien Blomme was an enthusiastic, sensitive and erudite creator, always attentive to his clients’ aspirations. No basement kitchen, dark narrow corridor or wooden stepladder for him – he wanted warm and friendly spaces.

Wielemans and Blomme had been friends for a long time; both of them were free-thinking and shared enthusiasm for a new type of aesthetic. Yvonne Wielemans adored Spain, and the couple took their architect to Granada. There he drew the first sketches of the new building, working with great freedom around one absolute mandatory: the creation of a patio. The Wielemans chose Azulejo ceramic tiles, imported them to Brussels and once again, the osmosis took its natural course.

In 1994 the Historic Monument and Sites Department of the Brussels-Capital Region listed Wielemans Hotel as well as its garden: the whole property reflected the expression of a certain modernism of this “crazy” time in Brussels.

The building was occupied for several years by CIVA (International Centre for City, Architecture & Landscape) before being acquired by the Generali Company in 1997, which rehabilitate it in an exhibitions and events venue.