Prestigious venues in Brussels

The Aegidium is the work of architect Guillaume Segers. The site opened its doors for the first time in December 1906 under the name Diamant Palace. It was one of the first cinemas in Brussels!

The building belonged to Léon Bejai-Dejonge who wished to transform this surprising architectural landmark into a venue for shows and parties. It became a centrepiece of Brussels nightlife. 

After the death of Bejai-Dejonge, Fernand Dierckx, the new owner, transformed it into a tea dance hall called Panthéon-Palace.

In 1929 the building was acquired by Canon Simons who favoured its use for parish activities. It was renamed Aegidium – a name which evokes the protective shadow of Saint-Gilles (Aegidius in Latin), the patron saint of the commune. The Aegidium is then renovated in 1933 by the architect Léon Denis and received an extension at ground level. The Saint-Gilles parish association maintained social and cultural activities up until 1985. Dilapidation of the site then prevented further activities.

A first step towards rehabilitation was taken in 2006 when the Aegidium was listed. Thereafter various projects were examined aimed at bringing the 3500 m² the complex architectural unity, and its mix of eclectic chambers and antichambers back to life.

Edificio invested, over and over again,  in this fantastic adventure in 2013, with support from the commune of Saint-Gilles, the Historic Monument and Sites Department of the Brussels-Capital Region, the Royal Committee for Monuments and Sites, and the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA)

The Aegidium is the work of architect Guillaume Segers. The site opened its doors for the first time in December 1906 under the name Diamant Palace. It was one of the first cinemas in Brussels!

The building belonged to Léon Bejai-Dejonge who wished to transform this surprising architectural landmark into a venue for shows and parties. It became a centrepiece of Brussels nightlife. 

After the death of Bejai-Dejonge, Fernand Dierckx, the new owner, transformed it into a tea dance hall called Panthéon-Palace.

In 1929 the building was acquired by Canon Simons who favoured its use for parish activities. It was renamed Aegidium – a name which evokes the protective shadow of Saint-Gilles (Aegidius in Latin), the patron saint of the commune. The Aegidium is then renovated in 1933 by the architect Léon Denis and received an extension at ground level. The Saint-Gilles parish association maintained social and cultural activities up until 1985. Dilapidation of the site then prevented further activities.

A first step towards rehabilitation was taken in 2006 when the Aegidium was listed. Thereafter various projects were examined aimed at bringing the 3500 m² the complex architectural unity, and its mix of eclectic chambers and antichambers back to life.

Edificio invested, over and over again,  in this fantastic adventure in 2013, with support from the commune of Saint-Gilles, the Historic Monument and Sites Department of the Brussels-Capital Region, the Royal Committee for Monuments and Sites, and the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA)